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Galaxy S8 and Plus

Posted by on Apr 27, 2017 in Android | 0 comments

Galaxy S8 and Plus

Samsung Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ Overview   That the Galaxy S8 feels like such a complete thought out of the box likely speaks to how long the phone was in development. In this overview, we’re going to be referring to the Galaxy S8 and S8+ interchangeably because, for all intents and purposes, and unlike last year, they are one phone in two sizes. That’s due to a renewed focus on fundamentals, on sticking with what works and evolving the experience in small, meaningful ways. There are regressions, in one major and one minor way, but we’ll get to that. It has been using the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ at different times for a total of two weeks. Both models are unlocked Canadian models connected to AT&T in the U.S. or Rogers in Canada, with Snapdragon 835 processors and Sony IMX camera sensors.     One day prior to the review embargo, Samsung released a small update for the Galaxy S8 and S8+ updating the software to Build G950WVLU1AQD9. The update prepared the units for Bixby Voice (which still doesn’t work) and updated the security patch to April 1, 2017. It also closed the loophole to allow remapping of the Bixby button. A Fitbit Alta HR was connected to the phones during the review period. The main takeaway here, and the reason we feel comfortable combining the two phones into a single review is because, unlike their predecessors, the S8 and S8+ are merely two sizes, and even then, aren’t that drastically different. The Galaxy S8 is 5.8 inches, with a new 18.5:9 aspect ratio; the S8+ is 6.2 inches, which makes it a bit taller and slightly wider, with a battery 16% larger. Since 2016, Samsung has built its flagship phones with aluminum frames and glass fronts and backs. And as good as the Galaxy S6 series was, the refinement in this year’s phones is noticeable. The curved glass front meets the metal frame at the same gradual angle as the back, which maintains symmetry that debuted on the Note 7, but here looks even better. Part of that comes down to Samsung’s color choices — color-matched metal around the Midnight Black model, or muted purple hue of the Orchid Gray — but much of it is about curves.   The corners curve; the display curves; the glass curves. This is a phone that has no sharp corners, nowhere to focus our attention away from the massive screen. If you think back to the proposition of the Galaxy S3, all the way back in 2012, Samsung wanted the focus on its “pebble design” and Nature UX. This phone, five years later, is the culmination of that journey, for better or worse. That shape and choice of materials also lends the phone an unprecedented slipperiness. You probably shouldn’t try to nestle the Galaxy S8 in the crook of your neck while you’re talking on the phone. After a few hours — sometimes a few minutes, even — the phone will be fingerprint-smudged and slippery, so if you’re clumsy you will probably want to invest in a case, or a microfiber cloth.   But hold it in your hand, and it feels fantastic. You’re getting either a 5.8-inch or 6.2-inch QHD+ display, but both use Samsung’s latest AMOLED panels,...

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LG G6

Posted by on Mar 14, 2017 in Android, News | 0 comments

LG G6 is now coming with better specifications 4 reasons you’ll want this sleek phone with its massive screen (and 2 reasons you won’t) The LG G6 could not have come at a better time. Launching its spec-packed, metal-and-glass G6 at the world’s largest mobile show (Mobile World Congress) gives LG a rare opportunity to prove itself after that lukewarm reception of last year’s modular-like G5, without the fear of being overshadowed by its biggest competitor, Samsung. (Samsung had to push back the launch of its Galaxy S8 flagship while dealing with fallout from its exploding Galaxy Note 7 fiasco.) And that’s great. When it comes to the G6, we like what we’ve seen so far. Gone is that funky modular body (but also the removable battery). In its place are a slim design that’s 80 percent screen and a water-resistant build. It’s a safer play for LG, which will have to battle the Galaxy S8, Google Pixel phones and OnePlus 3T and others. For the first time in a while, the phone maker stands a chance. If the G6 shares many of the Galaxy S8’s most important features and still costs less (as LG flagships usually do — costing about north of $600, £500 and AU$1,000), it could stabilize after last year’s G5 loss. There are a lot of reasons you should be excited about the G6 (and two reasons why perhaps you won’t be). But let’s start with what we liked… LG G6’s camera is a real looker The G6 is LG’s nicest-looking flagship yet, which I don’t say often, especially given last year’s G5. But the polished G6 has a streamlined aesthetic and a smooth unibody design (think the LG V20 with fewer seams or the G5 with fewer bumps). It comes in silver, black and white, though the white version will only be available in certain countries, not including the US. It’s virtually bezel-less. The 5.7-inch screen takes up roughly 80 percent of the phone, leaving thin margins all around. I like that the screen curves smoothly into the edges; it’s more comfortable for swiping and feels slightly luxurious. At 565 pixels per inch, the screen is super-sharp, and it takes on an 18:9 aspect ratio (aka: 2:1). This is unique considering most phones are 16:9. While it won’t change your life dramatically, that ratio allows some movies to make full use of that display. (For example, I saw a few minutes of “Daredevil” on Netflix on the G6, and the movie filled the screen, without generating letterboxes, those black bars that appear on the sides). The G6 is the company’s first dust- and water-resistant flagship, and it comes at a time when many of its competitors have already made their marquee phones splash-friendly. Like the V20 and the G5 before it, the G6 has two cameras on the back. But they aren’t to take artsy “bokeh” portraits like you do with the Apple iPhone 7 Plus. On the G6, you can switch between the standard 13-megapixel lens and the 120-degree wide-angle lens to capture more content in each frame. And if you’re really all about that wide-angle life, the 5-megapixel front-facing shooter has a wide-angle option as well. We’ll have to spend more time taking selfies to see if image quality is better than...

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Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 edge

Posted by on Nov 11, 2016 in Android, News | 0 comments

Samsung‘s Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge are still looking strong even though the Edge 7 has failed due to the battery problem. It had a phone that was better than the HTC 10, better than the Huawei P9 and it’s still better than the iPhone 7. But then the exploding Galaxy S8 and Samsung took a bit of a hit. Is it enough to make you think twice about buying a Samsung device? In a word, no. The Galaxy S7 is still the best phone we’ve reviewed this year. Maybe the Google Pixel phone will have something to say about that though. After the massive, and much needed, change in design direction Samsung took with the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge in 2015, all rumours pointed to things staying pretty much the same for the Galaxy S7. Well, it’s not like Apple, HTC or Sony make drastic changes to their industrial design every year. And that’s exactly the case here. Place the Galaxy S7 next to the S6 and you’d be hard pushed to instantly pick which one is which. Frankly, this doesn’t bother me in the slightest. The S6 was already one of the best-looking phones around, and the Galaxy S7 follows suit. It’s an absolute fingerprint magnet, though. After a few minutes of use, the entire back becomes a grubby mess that needs wiping down with a microfibre cloth. Along the top is the Nano SIM tray, which now holds a microSD slot, plus a microphone. The bottom houses the headphone socket, another microphone, a speaker and a micro USB port for charging. That speaker is one of the few missteps on this phone. It’s downward-facing, gets easily blocked by my hands when playing a game and it sounds tinny and distorted at high volume. I guess front-facing speakers weren’t included so the screen surround could be kept minimal, but it’s still a disappointment when a speaker sounds this...

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LG new smartphone V20

Posted by on Sep 20, 2016 in News | 0 comments

The LG is produced recent smartphone V20 to compete with Galaxy Note7 and Iphone 7, with a souped up second screen and an all-metal look. Once upon a time, all portable gadgets had removable/swappable power sources. Foreign handset makers tried to put up a fight, but in the end, the Apple bandwagon proved to be too strong, and virtually all smartphones today have its battery sealed in. Except LG. If you think having a removable battery is pointless, ask Samsung’s boss right now if he wishes the Note 7 had that option. If the Note 7 had swappable batteries, that recall would cost half a million instead of a billion. LG’s latest phone, the V20, manages to keep its battery unshackled despite going all metal. And the South Korean tech giant has obviously taken all the G5 criticism (modularity leading to slight build imperfections; the metal feels like plastic, etc) to heart because the V20 is in many ways an answer to that. The metal this time feels like legitimate metal, and the removable back plate fits seamlessly into the phone without gaps. The V20 manages to keep the removable battery despite going metal. The power button on the back doubles as the fingerprint sensor, and it’s very fast. Unlike the V10, you don’t have to press into the button to activate the sensor — just put your finger on it and the screen unlocks immediately. The power button on the back doubles as the fingerprint sensor, and it’s very fast. Unlike the V10, you don’t have to press into the button to activate the sensor — just put your finger on it and the screen unlocks immediately. The V20’s metal back can be removed by pressing on a button located on the right side of the phone (left); it would appear that LG really is abandoning its signature back volume buttons, as the V20 has volume buttons on the left side, just like the G5. The V20′s metal back can be removed by pressing on a button located on the right side of the phone (left); it would appear that LG really is abandoning its signature back volume buttons, as the V20 as below figures has volume buttons on the left side, just like the G5. The V20 is, of course, the sequel to last year’s V10, which developed quite a cult following due to its unabashed heavy duty look and powerful media capabilities (both consuming and creating). Though the V20 loses the rugged look of the V10, the phone doubles down on the power play. Whereas Apple is pushing for wireless audio (and let me guess, every other phone company will soon follow), the V20 brings a high-end DAC (digital to audio converter) that needs the use of wired headsets. Android Authority’s Rob Triggs wrote a great piece last week explaining what makes the ESS ES9218 DAC so great. To make a long story short, the V20 pumps out grade A audiophile level sound (with a wired headphone, anyway, as the V20′s bottom speaker is of average quality). On the media creating front, the V20′s dual-lens take great photos (more on this later, with a photo gallery) and can record videos in 24-bit lossless audio through three high acoustic overload point microphones, meaning the sound quality in recorded...

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iPhone 5S or iPhone 6? The Name Was Leaked In The Inventory Of Vodafone

Posted by on May 13, 2013 in iPhone, News | 0 comments

iPhone 5S or iPhone 6? The Name Was Leaked In The Inventory Of Vodafone

iPhone 5S or iPhone 6? The answer would have been discovered in an inventory of a British operator. For several months, consumers expect to find in June the iPhone 5S. It would be a slight improvement in the iPhone 5 released in September. The iPhone 6 will be proposed later and would highlight the most important changes. According to the document below, which would come from the inventory of Vodafone, Apple reportedly plans to introduce in a few weeks the iPhone 6. The iPhone 5S do not see the day, and Apple would intend to propose immediately major changes over last smartphone. iPhone 6 sooner than expected? This screenshot can not be authenticated and it is difficult to use as evidence. However, if the name is confirmed, Apple could surprise all consumers. The iPhone 6 should not be expected before 2014, but it could eventually be arriving in a few weeks. This will also put an end to the ritual of Apple implemented for several years. Apple tends to provide an improved version of the previous Smartphone by adding ‘S‘. The Cupertino company will hold on June 10 its WWDC conference, the future of the next iPhone may be discussed. Production in July? Apple could then move to the next level in order to overcome its rival which multiplies the terminals. According to rumors, the iPhone 6 could be equipped with a feature used in fingerprint recognition. Production of the new smartphone is expected to begin in July and it would be unveiled in September. All these data are speculative, they need to be taken...

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Samsung is Working on The 5G For Deployment in 2020

Posted by on May 13, 2013 in News | 0 comments

Samsung is Working on The 5G For Deployment in 2020

Samsung does not waste time. While many countries are just beginning to implement 4G on their territory… the South Korean giant is already working on the following: the 5G. Although it is currently only a test, the company was able to achieve a flow rate of 1 Gbit/s over a frequency band at 28 GHz (SHF: Super High Frequency) between two remote terminals by 2Km. Compared to the current 100 Mbit/s (theoretical) 4G LTE network, this speed will, according to Samsung, to download movies in a second, to enjoy the ultra HD streaming, practice remote surgery or play 3D games in streaming on the tablet or smartphone. This laboratory test is impressive, but do not expect to have the 5G immediately. Samsung expects to begin commercializing the technology in 2020. Although 5G should first be available in...

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The Samsung Galaxy S4 is More Expensive To Build Than an iPhone 5

Posted by on May 11, 2013 in Debates | 0 comments

The Samsung Galaxy S4 is More Expensive To Build Than an iPhone 5

The Samsung Galaxy S4 is more expensive to build than an iPhone 5, according to the statements of the IHS institute. The research institute IHS announced that Samsung Galaxy S4 32GB version cost more to build than an iPhone 5 32GB version also. Costs are estimated at respectively 237 and 217 U.S. dollars. The study also shows that Samsung, unlike most manufacturers, keeps most of the internal production process. “Samsung’s strength is the ability to be able to rely on itself“, Vincent Leung said, an analyst at IHS. However, we can not say either that Samsung does not import anything from outside. For smartphone versions destined for U.S. markets, the Korean uses a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor 600, while for the versions marketed in South Korea, the model incorporates a processor “homemade”, the Exynos, the cost of production is higher for Samsung. If the constructor had opted for an aluminum finish like the HTC One, the cost would probably gone. via |...

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Galaxy S4 And Storage Space, The Korean Company Responds To The Controversy

Posted by on May 8, 2013 in Debates | 0 comments

Galaxy S4 And Storage Space, The Korean Company Responds To The Controversy

One of the recent controversies about the Samsung Galaxy S4 is its storage space. Actually, concerning the 16 GB version, only 8.8 to 9.6 GB is available to the user. Samsung has officially responded to this controversy. The controversy came out after the CNET has tested the delivery default factory settings. Obviously, after this parameter “reset” , the user no longer has that 8.49 GB. Samsung responded: “For the 16GB Galaxy S4 , about 6.85 GB is occupied by the system, which is more than 1 GB on S3, in order to provide a higher screen resolution  and more powerful functions for our customers” The answer is way far from “clear”. Indeed, the screen resolution elements require a relatively better definition, larger images … which of course have an impact on the size of the files needed to run the system. Nevertheless, this does not explain the total weight of the system and pre-loaded applications. Is it a problem for the user? Not really, about 9 GB of data seem largely sufficient for applications. Other data (photos, music, videos, documents) can be stored on a microSD card (up to...

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Viber is Available To Download For Mac And PC

Posted by on May 7, 2013 in News | 0 comments

Viber is Available To Download For Mac And PC

You probably know Viber – Free Phone Calls & Text (App 3.5 stars – 19,957 votes, VF, 22.8 MB, App Store Link) on the iPhone, but did you know that the communications software just arrived on Mac and PC? Indeed, if the app is not on the Mac App Store, Viber for Mac can be downloaded on the official website directly. Download Viber for Mac Download Viber for PC You will use the Desktop version or you prefer Facetime, WhatsApp, Facebook or...

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Apple Had Announced WWDC 2013 For June 10-14, Presentation Of The iOS 7 And The OS X 10.9

Posted by on May 3, 2013 in Featured, News | 0 comments

Apple Had Announced WWDC 2013 For June 10-14, Presentation Of The iOS 7 And The OS X 10.9

Apple had officially annnonced the beginning of its WWDC 2013 which will start on June 10 in San Francisco and ends on June 14. As every year, developers will be invited to learn more about iOS and OS X operating systems, 100 sessions are planned with more than 1000 engineers listening, in the idea of ​​always helping the present developers. Apple also announced that it will unveil new versions of iOS and OS X. The logo on top can already suggest some speculations – new colors? new type of product? Apple always is giving an appetite without giving anything away. This was the case in the previous WWDC. The opening keynote will be held during the week of June 10, iOS 7 will be announced with OS X 10.9. Rumors suggest a version of iOS 7 more “simpler” with a full changes. It is true that users are eager to see the final result on the basis of many disappointments on the latest versions. For OS X 10.9, again little information suggest the arrival of Siri eventually. All responses will be provided by Apple in...

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